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English definition of “mass”

mass

adjective [before noun] uk   /mæs/ us  
C1 having an effect on or involving a large number of people or forming a large amount: weapons of mass destruction a mass murderer mass starvation Opposition groups plan to stage mass demonstrations all over the country.

mass

noun uk   /mæs/ us  

mass noun (LARGE AMOUNT)

B2 [S] a large amount of something that has no particular shape or arrangement: The explosion reduced the church to a mass of rubble. The forest is a mass of colour in autumn. masses [plural] mainly UK informal B2 a lot: [+ to infinitive] I've got masses to do at the weekend. There were masses of people in town today. the mass of sth most of something: The mass of the people support the government's reforms.

mass noun (SOLID LUMP)

[C] a solid lump with no clear shape: The sauce was now a sticky mass at the bottom of the pan.

mass noun (ORDINARY PEOPLE)

the masses the ordinary people who form the largest group in a society: He was popular with the aristocracy but failed to win the support of the masses.

mass noun (PHYSICS)

[C] specialized physics the amount of matter in any solid object or in any volume of liquid or gas: The acceleration of a body equals the force exerted on it divided by its mass.

mass noun (RELIGIOUS CEREMONY )

[C or U] (also Mass) a religious ceremony in some Christian Churches based on Jesus' last meal with his disciples, or music written for parts of this ceremony: to go to Mass
See also

mass

verb [I] uk   /mæs/ us  
to come together in large numbers: Thousands of troops have massed along the border in preparation for an invasion.
(Definition of mass from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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