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English definition of “mind”

mind

noun [C] uk   /maɪnd/ us  
B1 the part of a person that makes it possible for him or her to think, feel emotions, and understand things: Her mind was full of what had happened the night before, and she just wasn't concentrating. Of course I'm telling the truth - you've got such a suspicious mind! I just said the first thing that came into my mind. I'm not quite clear in my mind about what I'm doing. a very intelligent person: She was one of the most brilliant minds of the last century. all in the/your mind describes a problem that does not exist and is only imagined: His doctor tried to convince him that he wasn't really ill and that it was all in the mind. bear/keep sth in mind B2 to remember a piece of information when you are making a decision or thinking about a matter: Bearing in mind how young she is, I thought she did really well. Of course, repair work is expensive and you have to keep that in mind. go over sth in your mind (also turn sth over in your mind) to think repeatedly about an event that has happened: She would go over the accident again and again in her mind, wishing that she could somehow have prevented it.

mind

verb uk   /maɪnd/ us  

mind verb (BE ANNOYED)

A2 [I or T] (used in questions and negatives) to be annoyed or worried by something: Do you think he'd mind if I borrowed his book? [+ -ing verb] I don't mind having a dog in the house so long as it's clean.informal I wouldn't mind (= I would like) something to eat, actually. Would you mind turning (= please turn) your radio down a little please? Do you mind if I (= may I) put the TV on? [+ obj + -ing verb ] Do you mind me smoking? [+ question word] I don't mind what you wear so long as it's not that awful pink shirt. I'd prefer to stay in tonight, if you don't mind.mainly UK "Would you like tea or coffee?" "I don't mind - either." do you mind? said to someone when you feel annoyed with that person for what they have just done or said: Do you mind? That's my seat you're sitting on!

mind verb (BE CAREFUL)

B1 [T] mainly UK to be careful of, or give attention to something: [+ (that)] Mind that box - the bottom isn't very strong. Mind (that) you don't bang your head on the shelf when you stand up. Mind (= make certain that) you take enough money with you.old-fashioned Mind your language (= don't use swear words), young lady! mind (out)! mainly UK used to tell someone to move or be careful, or to warn someone of danger: Mind out! We're coming through with the stretcher. 'Hey, mind!' he said when she trod on his foot. Mind out for falling rocks on this part of the trail. mind how you go mainly UK informal said when you say goodbye to someone, meaning 'take care'

mind verb (TAKE CARE OF)

[T] to take care of someone or something: She asked me if I'd mind the children for an hour while she went shopping. Could you mind my bag for a moment while I go to the toilet?
(Definition of mind from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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