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English definition of “moment”

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moment

noun uk   /ˈməʊ.mənt/ us    /ˈmoʊ-/

moment noun (SHORT TIME)

A2 [C] a very short period of time: Can you wait a moment? I'll be ready in just a moment. A car drew up outside and a few moments later the doorbell rang. I'm expecting her to come at any moment (= very soon). Have you got a moment (= are you busy or do you have time to speak to me)?
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moment noun (OCCASION)

B1 [C] a particular time or occasion: When would be the best moment to tell the family? Don't leave it to/till the last moment (= the latest time possible). If you want a private conversation with her you'll have to choose your moment (= find a suitable time). The moment (that) (= as soon as) I get the money I'll send the ticket.at the moment A2 now: I'm afraid she's not here at the moment.for the moment B2 If you do something for the moment, you are doing it now, but might do something different in the future: Let's carry on with what we agreed for the moment.at this moment in time formal now: I can give no information at this precise moment in time.
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moment noun (IMPORTANCE)

of (great) moment formal very important: a decision of great moment
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Translations of “moment”
in Korean 찰나, 시점…
in Arabic لَحْظة…
in French moment, instant…
in Turkish saniye, an, lahza…
in Italian momento, attimo…
in Chinese (Traditional) 短時間, 片刻,瞬間,刹那…
in Russian мгновение, миг, момент…
in Polish chwila, moment…
in Spanish momento, instante…
in Portuguese momento, instante…
in German der Moment, der Augenblick…
in Catalan moment…
in Japanese 短い時間, 瞬間…
in Chinese (Simplified) 短时间, 片刻,瞬间,刹那…
(Definition of moment from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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