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English definition of “motion”

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motion

noun uk   /ˈməʊ.ʃən/ us    /ˈmoʊ-/

motion noun (MOVEMENT)

C2 [C or U] the act or process of moving, or a particular action or movement: The violent motion of the ship upset his stomach. He rocked the cradle with a gentle backwards and forwardsmotion. They showed the goal again in slow motion (= at a slower speed so that the action could be more clearly seen). [C] UK a polite way of referring to the process of getting rid of solid waste from the body, or the waste itself: The nurse asked if her motions were regular.
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motion noun (SUGGESTION)

C2 [C] a formal suggestion made, discussed, and voted on at a meeting: [+ to infinitive] Someone proposed a motion to increase the membership fee to $500 a year. The motion was accepted/passed/defeated/rejected.
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motion

verb [I or T, usually + adv/prep] uk   /ˈməʊ.ʃən/ us    /ˈmoʊ-/
to make a signal to someone, usually with your hand or head: I saw him motion to the man at the door, who quietly left. Her attendants all gathered round her, but she motioned them away. [+ obj + to infinitive ] He motioned me to sit down.
Translations of “motion”
in Korean 움직임…
in Arabic حَرَكة…
in French mouvement, geste, motion…
in Turkish hareket, önerge, teklif…
in Italian moto…
in Chinese (Traditional) 移動, 動, 運動…
in Russian движение, ход, жест…
in Polish ruch, wniosek…
in Spanish movimiento, gesto, moción…
in Portuguese movimento…
in German die Bewegung, der Antrag…
in Catalan moviment…
in Japanese 動き…
in Chinese (Simplified) 运动, 动, 移动…
(Definition of motion from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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