Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “moving”

See all translations

moving

adjective uk   /ˈmuː.vɪŋ/ us  

moving adjective (CHANGING POSITION)

[before noun] A moving object is one that moves: a moving target moving parts in a machine

moving adjective (FEELINGS)

B2 causing strong feelings of sadness or sympathy: a very moving story I find some of Brahms's music deeply moving.

moving adjective (CAUSING ACTION)

[before noun] causing someone to take action: Local parents were the moving force/spirit behind the safety improvements at the playground (= they were the people who made them happen).

moving

noun [U] uk   /ˈmuː.vɪŋ/ us  
the action of going to a different place to live or work: I hate moving.
Translations of “moving”
in Korean 감동적인…
in Arabic مُؤثّر…
in Portuguese comovente…
in Catalan conmovedor…
in Japanese 感動的な…
in Italian commovente…
in Chinese (Traditional) 位置正在改變, 行進中的, 活動的…
in Russian трогательный, движущийся…
in Turkish dokunaklı, duygulandırıcı, acıklı…
in Chinese (Simplified) 活动的, 行进中的…
in Polish wzruszający, ruchomy…
(Definition of moving from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of moving?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “moving” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

white Christmas

a Christmas when it snows

Word of the Day

Cleavage proves divisive in Cambridge’s words of 2014

by Alastair Horne,
December 19, 2014
​​​​ Other dictionaries may choose faddish novelties as their words of the year, but here at Cambridge, we like to do something different. We look for the words that have seen sudden surges in searches over the course of the year – words that have been baffling users of English and driven them

Read More 

cinderella surgery noun

December 15, 2014
cosmetic surgery to the feet We have all heard of people having nose jobs, boob jobs and liposuction – but now a new trend growing in popularity in America: Cinderella surgery.

Read More