muscle Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "muscle" - English Dictionary

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musclenoun

uk   us   /ˈmʌs.l̩/

muscle noun (BODY PART)

B2 [C or U] one of many tissues in the body that can tighten and relax to produce movement: neck/back/leg/stomach muscles facial muscles bulging/rippling (= large and clear to see) muscles He flexed his muscles (= tightened them to make them look large and strong) so that everyone could admire them. These exercises build muscle and increase stamina. a muscle spasm (= a sudden uncontrollable tightening movement)pull a muscle C1 to injure a muscle by stretching it too far so that it is very painful: Russell pulled a back muscle early in the game.
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muscle noun (POWER)

[U] the power to do difficult things or to make people behave in a certain way: This magazine has considerable financial muscle and can afford to pay top journalists. The company lacks the marketing muscle to compete with drug giants.
Translations of “muscle”
in Arabic عَضَلة…
in Korean 근육…
in Malaysian otot…
in French muscle…
in Turkish kas, adele, güç…
in Italian muscolo…
in Chinese (Traditional) 身體部分, 肌肉…
in Russian мышца, мускул, влияние…
in Polish mięsień, wpływy…
in Vietnamese cơ bắp…
in Spanish músculo…
in Portuguese músculo…
in Thai กล้ามเนื้อ…
in German der Muskel…
in Catalan múscul…
in Japanese 筋肉…
in Indonesian otot…
in Chinese (Simplified) 身体部份, 肌肉…
(Definition of muscle from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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