nail definition, meaning - what is nail in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “nail”

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nail

noun [C] uk   us   /neɪl/

nail noun [C] (METAL)

B2 a small, thin piece of metal with one pointed end and one flat end that you hit into something with a hammer, especially in order to fasten or join it to something else: a three-inch nail I stepped on a nail sticking out of the floorboards. Hammer a nail into the wall and we'll hang the mirror from it.
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nail noun [C] (BODY PART)

B2 a thin, hard area that covers the upper side of the end of each finger and each toe: Stop biting your nails! nail clippers a nail file
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nail

verb uk   us   /neɪl/

nail verb (FASTEN)

[T + adv/prep] to fasten something with nails: She had nailed a small shelf to the door. A notice had been nailed up on the wall. The lid of the box had been nailed down.

nail verb (CATCH)

[T] slang to catch someone, especially when they are doing something wrong, or to make it clear that they are guilty: The police had been trying to nail those guys for months.
Translations of “nail”
in Arabic مِسْمار, ظِفْر…
in Korean 못, 손톱…
in Malaysian kuku, paku…
in French ongle, clou…
in Turkish çivi, tırnak…
in Italian chiodo, unghia…
in Chinese (Traditional) 金屬, 釘,釘子…
in Russian гвоздь, ноготь…
in Polish gwóźdź, paznokieć…
in Vietnamese móng, cái đinh…
in Spanish uña, clavo…
in Portuguese prego, unha…
in Thai เล็บ, ตะปู…
in German der Nagel, nagel…
in Catalan clau, ungla…
in Japanese くぎ, (手足の)つめ…
in Indonesian kuku, paku…
in Chinese (Simplified) 金属, 钉,钉子…
(Definition of nail from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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