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English definition of “native”

native

adjective uk   /ˈneɪ.tɪv/ us    /-t̬ɪv/
B2 [before noun] relating to or describing someone's country or place of birth or someone who was born in a particular country or place: She returned to live and work in her native Japan. She's a native Californian. C2 refers to plants and animals that grow naturally in a place, and have not been brought there from somewhere else: Henderson Island in the Pacific has more than 55 species of native flowering plants. The horse is not native to America - it was introduced by the Spanish. B2 [before noun] relating to the first people to live in an area: The Aborigines are the native inhabitants of Australia. the native population native customs and traditions
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your native language/tongue B2 the first language that you learn: French is his native tongue. [before noun] A native ability or characteristic is one that a person or thing has naturally and is part of their basic character: his native wit
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Idioms

native

noun [C] uk   /ˈneɪ.tɪv/ us    /-t̬ɪv/
a person who was born in a particular place, or a plant or animal that lives or grows naturally in a place and has not been brought from somewhere else: a native of Monaco The red squirrel is a native of Britain. offensive old-fashioned someone who lived in a country, especially in Africa, before Europeans went there
(Definition of native from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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