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English definition of “nest”

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nest

noun [C] uk   /nest/ us  

nest noun [C] (HOME)

C2 a structure built by birds or insects to leave their eggs in to develop, and by some other animals to give birth or live in: a bird's nest a wasps'/hornets' nest a rat's nest Cuckoos are famous for laying their eggs in the nests of other birds. The alligators build their nests out of grass near the water's edge. a comfortable home: One day the children grow up and leave the nest. a place where something unpleasant or unwanted has developed: The diplomats have been sent home because their embassy has become a nest of spies.
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nest noun [C] (SET)

a set of things that are similar but different in size and have been designed to fit inside each other: I'd like a nest of tables for the living room.

nest

verb [I] uk   /nest/ us  
C2 to build a nest, or live in a nest: We've got some swallows nesting in our roof at the moment. Farm buildings are ideal nesting sites for barn owls.
Translations of “nest”
in Korean 둥지…
in Arabic عُش…
in French nid…
in Turkish kuş yuvası, yuva…
in Italian nido…
in Chinese (Traditional) 家, (鳥類或昆蟲的)窩,巢, (某些動物的)穴…
in Russian гнездо…
in Polish gniazdo…
in Spanish nido…
in Portuguese ninho…
in German das Nest…
in Catalan niu…
in Japanese (鳥などの)巣…
in Chinese (Simplified) 家, (鸟类或昆虫的)窝,巢, 某些动物的穴…
(Definition of nest from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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