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English definition of “now”

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now

adverb uk   /naʊ/ us  

now adverb (AT PRESENT)

A1 at the present time, not in the past or future: She used to be a teacher, but now she works in publishing. I may eat something later, but I'm not hungry now. Many people now own a smartphone.A2 immediately: I don't want to wait until tomorrow, I want it now!B2 used to express how long something has been happening, from when it began to the present time: She's been a vegetarian for ten years now. used in stories or reports of past events to describe a new situation or event: It was getting dark now and we were tired. used when describing a situation that is the result of what someone just said or did: Oh yes, now I know who you mean.any minute/moment/second/time now B2 very soon: Our guests will be arriving any moment now and the house is still a mess.now for ... informal used to introduce a new subject: And now for what we're going to do tomorrow.
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now adverb (IN SPEECH)

used in statements and questions to introduce or give emphasis to what you are saying: Now, where did I put my hat? There was a knock at the door. Now Jan knew her mother had promised to visit, so she assumed it was her. Hurry, now, or you'll miss the bus! Sorry, I can't today. Now if you'd asked me yesterday, I would have said yes.

now

noun [U] uk   /naʊ/ us  
the present moment or time: Now isn't a good time to speak to him. I thought you'd have finished by now. You should have mentioned it before now. That's all for now (= until a future point in time).from now on/as from now from this moment and always in the future: From now on the gates will be locked at midnight.
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now

(Definition of now from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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