nut definition, meaning - what is nut in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “nut”

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nut

noun uk   us   /nʌt/

nut noun (FOOD)

B2 [C] the dry fruit of particular trees that grows in a hard shell and can often be eaten: a Brazil/cashew nut Sprinkle some roasted chopped nuts on top.
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nut noun (METAL OBJECT)

[C] a small piece of metal with a hole in it through which you put a bolt: Nuts and bolts are used to hold pieces of machinery together.

nut noun (PERSON)

[C] informal or offensive a person who behaves in a very silly, stupid, or strange way or an offensive term for a person who is mentally ill: What kind of nut would leave a car on a railway track? [C] informal someone who is extremely enthusiastic about a particular activity or thing: James is a tennis nut - he plays every day.
See also

nut noun (HEAD)

[C] slang a person's head: Come on, use your nut (= think clearly)!

nut noun (MONEY)

[U] US informal the amount of money necessary to operate a business or cover your costs: With two houses, three cars and child-support payments, he just couldn't meet his nut, even with a second job.

nut

verb [T] uk   us   /nʌt/ informal
to hit someone or something with your head: The guy turned round and nutted him.
(Definition of nut from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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