onto definition, meaning - what is onto in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “onto”

See all translations

onto

preposition (also on to) uk   /ˈɒn.tu/  us   /ˈɑːn.tu/

onto preposition (MOVEMENT)

B1 used to show movement into or on a particular place: I slipped as I stepped onto the platform. The sheep were loaded onto trucks.
More examples

onto preposition (CHANGING SUBJECT)

B2 used about changing to, or starting to talk about, a different subject: How did we get onto this subject? Can we move onto the next item on the agenda? I'd now like to come onto my next point.

onto preposition (HOLDING)

hold, hang, grip, etc. onto to keep holding something: Hold onto my hand and you'll be perfectly safe.

onto preposition (KNOWING)

knowing about someone or something that can be useful to you: So how did you get onto this deal? David put me onto (= told me about) a really good restaurant. You're onto a good thing with this buy-one-get-one-free offer at the shop. knowing about something bad someone has done: He knows we're onto him. Who put the police onto (= told the police about) her?

onto preposition (ASKING)

UK If you are onto someone, you talk to that person, especially to ask them to do something, or to complain to them: I must get onto the plumber about the shower. Dad was onto her again about doing her homework.

onto preposition (ADDING)

used about someone or something that is added to or joins a particular thing: Imir's been voted onto the union committee. I've been having problems loading this software onto my computer.
(Definition of onto from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of onto?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “onto” in other dictionaries

SMART Thesaurus: On or off

“onto”: synonyms and related words:

Word of the Day

cup tie

a game between two teams trying to win a cup (= prize), especially in football

Word of the Day

What’s All The Commotion About? (Words to describe sounds)

by Kate Woodford,
May 20, 2015
​​​ In this post we look at a range of words and phrases that we use to describe noise and the absence of noise. Starting with complete quiet, we sometimes use the noun hush to describe silence: A hush fell over the room as the bride walked in./There was a deathly hush (=complete

Read More 

ancestral health noun

May 25, 2015
diet based on the presumed diet of our Palaeolithic ancestors ‘Ancestral health,’ to use a term popular among Paleo followers, has gone mass.

Read More