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English definition of “override”

override

verb uk   /ˌəʊ.vəˈraɪd/ us    /ˌoʊ.vɚ-/ (overrode, overridden)

override verb (NOT ACCEPT)

[T] (of a person who has the necessary authority) to decide against or refuse to accept a previous decision, an order, a person, etc.: Every time I make a suggestion at work, my boss overrides me/it. The president used his veto to override the committee's decision. [T] to operate an automatic machine by hand: He overrode the autopilot when he realized it was malfunctioning.

override verb (CONTROL)

[T] to take control over something, especially in order to change the way it operates: The pills are designed to override your body's own hormones.

override verb (MORE IMPORTANT)

[T] to be more important than something: Parents' concern for their children's future often overrides all their other concerns.

override verb (TRAVEL)

[I] to travel on public transport further than your ticket allows you to: There is a £20 penalty for passengers who travel without a ticket or override.

override

noun [C] uk   /ˌəʊ.vəˈraɪd/ us    /ˌoʊ.vɚ-/

override noun [C] (DEVICE)

a device that changes the control of a machine or system in special situations, especially from automatic to manual: The heating system has a manual override.

override noun [C] (POLITICS)

in American politics, an occasion when an elected group of people refuses to accept a decision made by an elected leader: The vote fell short of the majority needed for an override of the Governor's veto.
(Definition of override from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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