pad definition, meaning - what is pad in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “pad”

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pad

noun [C] uk   us   /pæd/

pad noun [C] (MATERIAL)

a piece of soft, thick cloth or rubber, used to protect a part of the body, give shape to something, or clean something: a knee/shoulder pad Football players often wear shin pads to protect their legs. In the 1980s, shoulder pads were very fashionable in women's clothes. She wiped her eye make-up off with a cotton wool pad.

pad noun [C] (PAPER)

a number of pieces of paper that have been fastened together along one side, used for writing or drawing on: I have a pad and pencil for taking notes. I always keep a pad of paper by the phone.
See also

pad noun [C] (FLAT SURFACE)

a hard flat area of ground where helicopters can take off and land, or from which rockets are sent: The hotel has its own helicopter pad. Missiles have been launched from their pads deep in enemy territory. one of the large, flat leaves of a water lily : a lily pad

pad noun [C] (FOOT)

the soft part at the bottom of a cat or dog's paw (= foot)

pad noun [C] (HOUSE)

old-fashioned or humorous informal a person's house or apartment: a bachelor pad

pad

verb [T] uk   us   /pæd/ (-dd-)
to put pieces of soft material in something to make it soft, give it a different shape, or protect what is inside: These walking boots are padded with shock-resistant foam.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of pad from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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