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English definition of “palm”

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palm

noun [C] uk   /pɑːm/ us  

palm noun [C] (HAND)

C2 the inside part of your hand from your wrist to the base of your fingers: This tiny device fits into the palm of your hand.read sb's palm to look at the lines on the inside of someone's hand and say what these lines say about their character and future
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palm noun [C] (TREE)

C1 ( also palm tree) a tree that grows in hot countries and has a tall trunk with a mass of long pointed leaves at the top: date palms palm fronds The island has long golden beaches fringed by palm trees.

palm

verb [T] uk   /pɑːm/ us  
to make something seem to disappear by hiding it in the palm of your hand as part of a trick, or to steal something by picking it up in a way that will not be noticed: I suspected that he had palmed a playing card.
Translations of “palm”
in Korean 손바닥, 야자나무…
in Arabic راحة اليَّد, كَف, نَخْلة…
in French paume…
in Turkish avuç içi, aya, palmiye…
in Italian palmo, palma…
in Chinese (Traditional) 手, 手掌,手心…
in Russian ладонь, пальма…
in Polish dłoń, palma…
in Spanish palma…
in Portuguese palma, palmeira…
in German die Handinnenfläche…
in Catalan palmell, palmera…
in Japanese 手のひら, ヤシ, ヤシの木…
in Chinese (Simplified) 手, 手掌,手心…
(Definition of palm from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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