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English definition of “paper”

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paper

noun uk   /ˈpeɪ.pər/ us    /-pɚ/

paper noun (MATERIAL)

A1 [U] thin, flat material made from crushed wood or cloth, used for writing, printing, or drawing on: a piece/sheet of paper a pack of writing paper Dictionaries are usually printed on thin paper. a paper bag This card is printed on recycled paper (= paper made from used paper). Get the idea down on paper (= write it) before you forget it. She works on paper (= writes things on paper) because she hates computers.
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paper noun (DOCUMENT)

B1 [C] a newspaper: a daily/weekly/local/national paper The photo was on the front page of all the papers.papers [plural] official documents, especially ones that show who you are: The border guards stopped me and asked to see my papers.A2 [C] UK a set of printed questions in an exam: Candidates must answer two questions from each paper. The geography paper is not till next week.C2 [C] a piece of writing on a particular subject written by an expert and usually published in a book or journal, or read aloud to other people: He's giving a paper on thermodynamics at a conference at Manchester University.B1 [C] US ( UK essay) a short piece of writing on a particular subject, especially one done by students as part of the work for a course: Mr Jones thought my history paper was terrific. For homework I want you to write a paper on endangered species.

paper

verb [T] uk   /ˈpeɪ.pər/ us    /-pɚ/
to cover a wall, room, etc. with wallpaper
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of paper from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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