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English definition of “past”

past

preposition, adverb uk   /pɑːst/ us    /pæst/

past preposition, adverb (POSITION)

A2 in or to a position that is further than a particular point: I live on Station Road, just past the post office. Three boys went past us on mountain bikes. Was that Peter who just jogged past in those bright pink shorts?

past preposition, adverb (TIME)

A1 used to say what the time is when it is a particular number of minutes after an hour: It's five/ten/a quarter/twenty/twenty-five/half past three. I've got to leave at twenty past or I'll miss that train. B2 above a particular age or further than a particular point: She's past the age where she needs a babysitter. Do what you want, I'm past caring (= I don't care any longer).

past

adjective uk   /pɑːst/ us    /pæst/

past

noun [S] uk   /pɑːst/ us    /pæst/

past noun [S] (TIME BEFORE)

B1 the period before and until, but not including, the present time: Evolution can explain the past, but it can never predict the future. In the past, this sort of work was all done by hand. By winning the 1500 metres, he joins some of the great names of the past. a past a part of someone's life in which they did unacceptable or dishonest things: He's a man with a past.

past noun [S] (GRAMMAR)

A2 language the form of a verb used to describe actions, events, or states that happened or existed before the present time: The past of 'change' is 'changed'.
(Definition of past from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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