patrol definition, meaning - what is patrol in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “patrol”

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patrol

verb [I or T] uk   /pəˈtrəʊl/  us   /-ˈtroʊl/ (-ll-)
(especially of soldiers or the police) to go around an area or a building to see if there is any trouble or danger: The whole town is patrolled by police because of the possibility of riots. A security guard with a dog patrols the building site at night. Coastguards found a deserted boat while patrolling (along) the coast.

patrol

noun uk   /pəˈtrəʊl/  us   /-ˈtroʊl/

patrol noun (CHECKING)

[C or U] the act of checking that there is no trouble or danger in a building or area: a highway patrol Three reconnaissance aircraft are permanently on patrol.

patrol noun (GROUP)

[C, + sing/pl verb] a small group of soldiers or military ships, aircraft, or vehicles, especially one that patrols an area: Our forward patrol has/have spotted the enemy.
Translations of “patrol”
in Arabic دَوْرِيّة…
in Korean 순찰…
in Malaysian meronda…
in French patrouiller…
in Turkish devriye, askerî devriye, devriye araçları…
in Italian perlustrazione…
in Chinese (Traditional) (尤指士兵或員警)巡邏,巡查…
in Russian патрулирование, патруль, дозор…
in Polish patrol…
in Vietnamese tuần tra…
in Spanish patrullar…
in Portuguese patrulha…
in Thai ตรวจตรา…
in German patroullieren…
in Catalan patrulla…
in Japanese パトロール, 巡回…
in Indonesian berpatroli…
in Chinese (Simplified) (尤指士兵或警察)巡逻,巡查…
(Definition of patrol from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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