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English definition of “pattern”

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pattern

noun uk   /ˈpæt.ən/ us    /ˈpæt̬.ɚn/

pattern noun (WAY)

B2 [C] a particular way in which something is done, is organized, or happens: The pattern of family life has been changing over recent years. A pattern is beginning to emerge from our analysis of the accident data. In this type of mental illness, the usual pattern is bouts of depression alternating with elation. Many behaviour(al) patterns have been identified in the chimp colony.
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pattern noun (ARRANGEMENT)

B1 [C] any regularly repeated arrangement, especially a design made from repeated lines, shapes, or colours on a surface: Look, the frost has made a beautiful pattern on the window. The curtains had a floral pattern.
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pattern noun (EXAMPLE)

[C usually singular] something that is used as an example, especially to copy: The design is so good it's sure to set the pattern for many others.

pattern noun (DRAWING)

B2 [C] a drawing or shape used to show how to make something: a knitting pattern a dress pattern Cut out all of the pieces from the paper pattern and pin them on the cloth.

pattern noun (PIECE)

[C] a small piece of cloth or paper taken from a usual-sized piece and used to show what it looks like: a pattern book
Synonym
(Definition of pattern from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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