Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “peak”

See all translations

peak

noun [C] uk   /piːk/ us  

peak noun [C] (HIGHEST POINT)

B2 the highest, strongest, or best point, value, or level of skill: Holiday flights reach a peak during August. Beat the egg whites until they are stiff enough to form firm peaks. We saw a victory by an athlete at the very peak of her fitness and career.
More examples

peak noun [C] (MOUNTAIN)

B1 the pointed top of a mountain, or the mountain itself: It is one of the most difficult peaks to climb.
More examples

peak noun [C] (HAT PART)

mainly UK ( US usually visor) the flat curved part of a cap that goes above the eyes of the person who is wearing it

peak

adjective [before noun] uk   /piːk/ us  
Peak times are the times when most people are using or doing something: Traffic congestion is really bad at peak periods (= when it is busiest). It is most expensive to advertise at peak viewing times (= those with the most people watching). Don't go there in the peak (= busiest) season - it'll be hot and crowded. Peak levels or rates are when they are at their highest: peak rate electricity

peak

verb [I] uk   /piːk/ us  
to reach the highest, strongest, or best point, value, or level of skill: Official figures show that unemployment peaked in November.
(Definition of peak from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of peak?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “peak” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

limber up

to do gentle exercises to stretch the muscles in order to prepare the body for more active physical exercise

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

dumbwalking noun

April 20, 2015
walking slowly, without paying attention to the world around you because you are consulting a smartphone He told me dumbwalking probably wouldn’t be a long-term problem.

Read More