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English definition of “phone”

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phone

noun uk   /fəʊn/ us    /foʊn/

phone noun (PHONE)

A1 [C or U] ( formal telephone) a device that uses either a system of wires, along which electrical signals are sent, or a system of radio signals to make it possible for you to speak to someone in another place who has a similar device: Just then, his phone rang. Could you answer the phone? We speak on the/by phone about twice a week. You had three phone calls this morning. If the phone lines are busy, please try again later. Could you pick the phone up for me - my hands are wet. I left the phone off the hook, so it wouldn't ring. I was so angry I just put/slammed the phone down (on her) (= replaced it before our conversation was finished).be on the phone to be using the phone: That son of mine is on the phone all day! UK to have a landline (= fixed phone) in the home: Are the Middletons on the phone, do you know?
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phone noun (PHONETIC UNIT)

[C] specialized phonetics a unit of sound at the phonetic level, used when studying speech

phone

verb [I or T] uk   /fəʊn/ us    /foʊn/
A1 to communicate with someone by phone: She phoned just after lunch. He's phoned me (up) every day this week.
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Phrasal verbs
Translations of “phone”
in Korean 전화기…
in Arabic هاتِف…
in French téléphone…
in Turkish telefon…
in Italian telefono…
in Chinese (Traditional) 電話, (電話的)聽筒…
in Russian телефон…
in Polish telefon…
in Spanish teléfono…
in Portuguese telefone…
in German das Telefon…
in Catalan telèfon…
in Japanese 電話機…
in Chinese (Simplified) 电话, (电话的)听筒…
(Definition of phone from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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