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English definition of “pick sth up”

pick sth up

verb uk phrasal verb with pick   /pɪk/ us  

(LEARN)

B2 to learn a new skill or language by practising it rather than being taught it: Don't bother with the computer manual - you'll pick it up as you go along. When you live in a country you soon pick up the language. to learn interesting or useful information from someone or something: The nurse had picked up the information from a conversation she overheard.

(BUY)

to buy something cheaply: She picked up some real bargains in the sale.

(WIN)

to win or get a prize or something that gives you an advantage, such as votes or support: The People's Front expect to pick up a lot more votes in this year's elections.

(SIGNAL)

(of a piece of electrical equipment) to receive a signal: Can you pick up (= receive broadcasts from) Moscow on your radio?

(NOTICE)

to notice and react to something: Police dogs picked up the scent of the two men from clothes they had left behind.

(ILLNESS)

to catch an illness from someone or something, caused by bacteria or a virus: He picked up malaria when he was visiting the country on business.
(Definition of pick sth up phrasal verb, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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“pick sth up” in English

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