picture definition, meaning - what is picture in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “picture”

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picture

noun uk   /ˈpɪk.tʃər/  us   /-tʃɚ/

picture noun (IMAGE)

A1 [C] a drawing, painting, photograph, etc.: Freddy drew/painted a picture of my dog. We took a picture of (= photographed) the children on their new bicycles. I hate having my picture taken (= being photographed).B2 [C] an image seen on a television or cinema screen: We can't get a clear picture.B1 [C] a film: Could this be the first animated movie to win a best picture award?the pictures [plural] old-fashioned the cinema: Let's go to the pictures tonight.B2 [C] something you produce in your mind, by using your imagination or memory: I have a very vivid picture of the first time I met Erik.
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picture noun (IDEA)

B2 [S] (an idea of) a situation: After watching the news, I had a clearer picture of what was happening. The picture emerging in reports from the battlefield is one of complete confusion. [S] a situation described in a particular way: figurative The experts are painting a gloomy/brighter/rosy picture of the state of the economy.
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picture

verb [T] uk   /ˈpɪk.tʃər/  us   /-tʃɚ/
C1 to imagine something: Picture the scene - the crowds of people and animals, the noise, the dirt. [+ -ing verb] Try to picture yourself lying on a beach in the hot sun. [+ question word] Picture to yourself how terrible that day must have been.formal He was pictured (= an artist had painted him) as a soldier in full uniform.
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(Definition of picture from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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