pill definition, meaning - what is pill in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “pill”

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pill

noun [C] uk   us   /pɪl/

pill noun [C] (MEDICINE)

B1 a small solid piece of medicine that a person swallows without chewing (= crushing with the teeth): a sleeping pill a vitamin pill My mother takes three or four pills a day. Jamie's always had trouble swallowing pills.the pill a type of pill for women that is taken every day in order to prevent them from becoming pregnant: Are you on the pill?
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pill noun [C] (PERSON)

US an annoying person: Jennifer was being such a pill today.

pill noun [C] (ON CLOTHING)

US (UK bobble) a small ball of threads that develops on the surface of clothes or material: She sat there sulking and picking the pills off her sweater.

pill

verb [I] uk   us   /pɪl/ US (UK bobble)
If a piece of clothing or material pills, it develops small balls of threads on its surface.
Translations of “pill”
in Arabic حَبّة دَواء…
in Korean 알약…
in Malaysian pil…
in French pilule…
in Turkish hap, ilaç, tablet…
in Italian pillola…
in Chinese (Traditional) 藥, 藥丸, 藥片…
in Russian таблетка…
in Polish tabletka, pigułka…
in Vietnamese viên thuốc…
in Spanish píldora, pastilla…
in Portuguese pílula, comprimido…
in Thai ยาเม็ด…
in German die Pille…
in Catalan píndola…
in Japanese 錠剤, 丸薬…
in Indonesian pil…
in Chinese (Simplified) 药, 药丸, 药片…
(Definition of pill from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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