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English definition of “plate”

plate

noun uk   /pleɪt/ us  

plate noun (DISH)

A1 [C] a flat, usually round dish with a slightly raised edge that you eat from or serve food from: paper/plastic/china plates a dinner/salad plate clean/dirty plates There's still lots of food on your plate. [C] (also plateful) an amount of food on a plate: Stephen ate three plates of spaghetti.

plate noun (FLAT PIECE)

[C] a flat piece of something that is hard and does not bend: Thick bony plates protected the dinosaur against attack. The ship's deck is composed of steel plates. [C] specialized publishing a flat piece of metal with words and/or pictures on it that can be printed

plate noun (PICTURE)

[C] specialized publishing a picture, especially in colour, in a book: The three birds differ in small features (see Plate 4).

plate noun (IN BASEBALL)

the plate [S] US informal for home plate

plate noun (THIN LAYER)

[U] ordinary metal with a layer of another metal on top: The knives and forks are silver plate. [U] objects, especially plates, dishes, and cups, completely made of a valuable metal such as gold or silver: The thieves got away with a large quantity of church plate.

plate

verb [T] uk   /pleɪt/ us  
to cover a metal object with a thin layer of another metal, especially gold or silver: We normally plate the car handles with nickel and then chrome.
-plated
suffix uk   /-pleɪ.tɪd/ us    /-t̬ɪd/
Gold-plated earrings are much cheaper than solid gold ones.
plating
noun [U] uk   /ˈpleɪ.tɪŋ/ us    /-t̬ɪŋ/
gold/silver plating
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of plate from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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