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English definition of “pluck”

pluck

verb uk   /plʌk/ us  

pluck verb (REMOVE)

[T] to pull something, especially with a sudden movement, in order to remove it: Caged birds sometimes pluck out their breast feathers. He plucked the letter from/out of my hand, and ran off with it. Do you pluck your eyebrows (= remove some of the hairs from them to give them a better shape)? [T] to remove the feathers from a chicken or other bird so that it can be cooked and eaten [T usually passive] to remove someone suddenly from a situation that is ordinary: He was plucked from obscurity to star in the film. [T] to remove someone quickly from a dangerous or difficult situation: The last passengers were plucked from the ship just seconds before it sank. [T] Indian English to collect flowers by breaking or cutting their stems; pick

pluck verb (MUSIC)

[I or T] (US also pick) to pull and then release the strings of a musical instrument with your finger to play notes: He sat on the bed, idly plucking (at) the strings of his guitar.
Phrasal verbs

pluck

noun [U] uk   /plʌk/ informal us  
courage and a strong wish to succeed: She showed a lot of pluck in standing up to her boss.
(Definition of pluck from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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