poison definition, meaning - what is poison in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “poison”

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poison

noun [C or U] uk   us   /ˈpɔɪ.zən/
B2 a substance that can make people or animals ill or kill them if they eat or drink it: The pest control officer put bowls of rat poison in the attic. Her drink had been laced with a deadly poison.
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poison

verb [T] uk   us   /ˈpɔɪ.zən/

poison verb [T] (ADD SUBSTANCE)

B2 to kill a person or animal or to make them very ill by giving them poison: Four members of the family had been poisoned, but not fatally.B2 to put poison in someone's food or drink: He said that someone had poisoned his coffee.B2 to add dangerous chemicals or other harmful substances to something such as water or air: The chemical leak had poisoned the water supply.

poison verb [T] (SPOIL)

to spoil a friendship or another situation, by making it very unpleasant: The long dispute has poisoned relations between the two countries.
Translations of “poison”
in Arabic سَمّ…
in Korean 독약…
in Malaysian racun…
in French poison…
in Turkish zehir…
in Italian veleno…
in Chinese (Traditional) 毒, 毒藥,毒物…
in Russian яд…
in Polish trucizna…
in Vietnamese chất độc…
in Spanish veneno…
in Portuguese veneno…
in Thai ยาพิษ…
in German das Gift, Gift-……
in Catalan verí…
in Japanese 毒, 毒薬…
in Indonesian racun…
in Chinese (Simplified) 毒, 毒药,毒物…
(Definition of poison from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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