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English definition of “positive”

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positive

adjective uk   /ˈpɒz.ə.tɪv/ us    /ˈpɑː.zə.t̬ɪv/

positive adjective (HOPEFUL)

B1 full of hope and confidence, or giving cause for hope and confidence: a positive attitude On a more positive note, we're seeing signs that the housing market is picking up. The past ten years have seen some very positive developments in East-West relations. There was a very positive response to our new design - people seemed very pleased with it.
Opposite
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positive adjective (CERTAIN)

B2 certain and without any doubt: [+ (that)] Are you positive (that) you saw me switch the iron off? "Are you sure it's okay for me to use your mother's car?" "Positive." "It was him - I saw him take it." "Are you positive about that?"

positive adjective (TEST RESULTS)

C2 (of a medical test) showing that a person has the disease or condition for which they are being tested: a positive pregnancy test He's HIV positive. She tested positive for hepatitis.
Opposite

positive adjective (COMPLETE)

[before noun] (used to add force to an expression) complete: Far from being a nuisance, she was a positive joy to have around.

positive adjective (ABOVE ZERO)

(of a number or amount) more than zero: Two is a positive number.
Opposite

positive adjective (ELECTRICITY)

being the type of electrical charge that is carried by protons
Opposite

positive adjective (BLOOD TYPE)

having the rhesus factor in the blood: My blood type is O positive.
positiveness
noun [U] uk   /-nəs/ us  
(Definition of positive from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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