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English definition of “post”

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post

noun uk   /pəʊst/ us    /poʊst/

post noun (LETTERS)

A2 [U] mainly UK ( US usually mail) letters, etc. that are delivered to homes or places of work: I'd been away for a few days so I had a lot of post waiting for me. My secretary usually opens my post, unless it's marked "private". Has the post come/arrived yet?A2 [U] mainly UK ( US usually mail) the public system that exists for the collecting and delivering of letters: My letter must have got lost in the post. If you don't want to take it there, you can just send it by post. [S] UK the time during the day when letters, etc. are collected or delivered: I missed the post this morning. Did you manage to catch the post?
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post noun (JOB)

B2 [C] a job in a company or organization: Teaching posts are advertised in Tuesday's edition of the paper. She's held the post for 13 years. They have several vacant posts.
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post noun (POLE)

[C] a vertical stick or pole fixed into the ground, usually to support something or show a position [C] used as a combining form: a lamppost a signpostthe post in the sport of horse racing, the place where the race finishes or, less often, the place from which the race starts in sports such as football, a goalpost (= either of two vertical posts showing the area in which the ball is kicked to score points)
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post noun (PLACE)

[C] the particular place where someone works, especially where a soldier is told to be for military duty, usually as a guard: The soldier was disciplined for deserting his post. I was ordered to remain at my post until the last customer had left.

post noun (MESSAGE)

internet & telecoms something such as a message or picture that you publish on a website or using social media: Lots of people have commented on my post. You can change your privacy settings so that only certain people can see your posts.

post

verb uk   /pəʊst/ us    /poʊst/

post verb (LETTERS)

A2 UK ( US mail) [T] to send a letter or parcel by post: Did you remember to post my letter? I must post that parcel (off) or she won't get it in time for her birthday. [+ two objects] Could you post me the details/post the details to me? UK [T] to put an object through a letterbox (= special opening in a door): Just post the key through the door after you've locked it.
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post verb (PLACE)

C2 [T] to send someone to a particular place to work: He's been posted to Pakistan for six months. Guards were posted at all the doors.

post verb (MESSAGE)

[T] to stick or pin a notice on a wall in order to make it publicly known: Company announcements are usually posted (up) on the noticeboard.B1 [I or T] internet & telecoms to publish something such as a message or picture on a website or using social media: I never post anything on the Internet that I wouldn't want my boss to see. She hardly ever posts on Facebook. Somebody's been posting obscene messages in this chat room.

post verb (PAY)

US to pay money, especially so that a person who has been accused of committing a crime can be free until their trial: She has agreed to post bail for her brother.

post verb (RESULTS)

to announce a company's financial results: The oil company posted profits of $25.1 billion.
(Definition of post noun, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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