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English definition of “prize”

prize

noun [C] uk   /praɪz/ us  
A2 something valuable, such as an amount of money, that is given to someone who succeeds in a competition or game or that is given to someone as a reward for doing very good work: The critics' prize for best film was won by Marc Abbott for 'Belly Laugh'. I won a prize in the raffle. The first (= main) prize is a weekend for two in Bruges. The prize money for literary competitions can be as high as £40,000. something important and valuable that is difficult to achieve or get: The prize would be her hand in marriage.

prize

verb uk   /praɪz/ us  

prize verb (REWARD)

[T often passive] to think that someone or something is very valuable or important: In parts of Asia this plant is prized for its medicinal qualities. I prize that intimacy above everything.

prize verb (LIFT)

[T + adv/prep] (UK also prise) to use force to lift something off something else, for example by pressing a tool against a fixed point; to separate things using force: I prized the lid off with a spoon. The window had been prized open with a jemmy. She couldn't prize his fingers apart to get the key.
Phrasal verbs

prize

adjective [before noun] uk   /praɪz/ us  
A prize animal, flower, or vegetable is one that has won or deserves to win a prize in a competition because it is of very good quality: a prize bull a prize marrow describes something that is a very good or important example of its type: prize assets Some prize idiot (= extremely foolish person) forgot to lock the door.
(Definition of prize from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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