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English definition of “proof”

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proof

noun uk   /pruːf/ us  

proof noun (SHOWING TRUTH)

B2 [C or U] a fact or piece of information that shows that something exists or is true: [+ that] Do they have any proof that it was Hampson who stole the goods? I have a suspicion that he's having an affair, though I don't have any concrete (= definite) proof. If anyone needs proof of Andrew Davies' genius as a writer, this novel is it. "How old are you?" "21." "Do you have any proof on you?" Keep your receipt as proof of purchase.
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proof noun (PRINTED COPY)

[C] a printed copy of something that is examined and corrected before the final copies are printed: I was busy correcting proofs.

proof

adjective [after noun] uk   /pruːf/ us  

proof adjective [after noun] (ALCOHOL)

of the stated alcoholic strength, a higher number meaning a greater amount of alcohol: It says on the bottle that it's 60 percent proof.

proof adjective [after noun] (PROTECTED)

formal providing protection against something: No household security devices are proof against (= protect completely against) the determined burglar. Her virtue would be proof against his charms.

proof

verb [T] uk   /pruːf/ us  
to treat a surface with a substance that will protect it against something, especially water
Translations of “proof”
in Korean 증거, 증명…
in Arabic بُرْهان, إثْبات…
in French preuve, épreuve…
in Turkish kanıt, delil…
in Italian prova…
in Chinese (Traditional) 證明真實, 證據, 證物…
in Russian доказательство…
in Polish dowód…
in Spanish prueba…
in Portuguese prova…
in German der Beweis, die Korrekturfahne, der Probeabzug…
in Catalan prova…
in Japanese 証拠, 証明…
in Chinese (Simplified) 证明真实, 证据, 证物…
(Definition of proof noun, adjective, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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