prop definition, meaning - what is prop in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “prop”

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prop

verb [T + adv/prep] uk   /prɒp/  us   /prɑːp/ (-pp-)
to support something physically, often by leaning it against something else or putting something under it: I propped my bike (up) against the wall. She was sitting at the desk with her chin propped on her hands. This window keeps on closing - I'll have to prop it open with something.
Phrasal verbs

prop

noun uk   /prɒp/  us   /prɑːp/

prop noun (IN FILM/THEATRE)

[C usually plural] an object used by the actors performing in a play or film: The set is minimal and the only props used in the show are a table, a chair and a glass of water.

prop noun (ON AIRCRAFT/SHIP)

[C] informal for propeller

prop noun (SUPPORT)

[C] an object that is used to support something by holding it up: I need some sort of a prop to keep the washing line up.figurative A lot of people use cigarettes as a sort of social prop (= to make them feel more confident). (also prop forward) a player in a rugby team who is large and strong, and who supports the scrum

prop noun (RESPECT)

props [plural] mainly US informal respect for someone: I have to give her her props for being such a great athlete.
Translations of “prop”
in Vietnamese cột chống…
in Spanish puntal…
in Thai ไม้ค้ำยัน…
in Malaysian sangga…
in French support…
in German die Stütze…
in Chinese (Traditional) 支撐, 支持…
in Indonesian penyangga…
in Chinese (Simplified) 支撑, 支持…
(Definition of prop from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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