propose definition, meaning - what is propose in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “propose”

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propose

verb uk   /prəˈpəʊz/  us   /-ˈpoʊz/

propose verb (SUGGEST)

B2 [T] to offer or suggest a possible plan or action for other people to consider: [+ that] I propose that we wait until the budget has been announced before committing ourselves to any expenditure. [+ -ing verb] He proposed dealing directly with the suppliers. She proposed a boycott of the meeting. He proposed a motion that the chairman resign. [T] to suggest someone for a position or as a member of an organization: To be nominated for union president you need one person to propose you and another to second you.B2 [I] to ask someone to marry you: I remember the night your father proposed to me.propose a toast to ask people at a formal social occasion to express their good wishes or respect for someone by holding up their glasses, usually of alcohol, at the same time and then drinking from them: Now, if you'd all please raise your glasses, I'd like to propose a toast to the bride and groom.
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propose verb (INTEND)

B2 [T] formal to intend to do something: [+ to infinitive] How do you propose to complete the project in such a short time scale? [+ -ing verb] How do you propose tackling this problem? I do not propose to reveal details at this stage. What we are proposing is a radical change in approach.
proposed
adjective uk   /-ˈpəʊzd/  us   /-ˈpoʊzd/
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B2 There have been huge demonstrations against the proposed factory closure.
(Definition of propose from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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