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English definition of “pull”

pull

verb uk   /pʊl/ us  

pull verb (MOVE TOWARDS YOU)

A2 [I or T] to move something towards yourself, sometimes with great physical effort: Could you help me move this bookcase over there? You pull and I'll push. He pulled the chair away from the desk. He pulled the heavy box across the floor to the door. [+ obj + adj ] He pulled the door open. The car was pulling a caravan. The sun was so strong we had to pull down the blinds. She pulled out the drawer.

pull verb (REMOVE)

B1 [T] to take something out of or away from a place, especially using physical effort: He pulled off his sweater. The dentist pulled both teeth out. I spent the morning pulling up the weeds in the flowerbeds. [T] to remove or stop something that was going to be published or broadcast, especially because it is found to be offensive or not accurate: When officials realized the cultural gaffe, the company pulled the ad and apologized.

pull verb (MOVE)

B2 [I + adv/prep] to move in the stated direction: During the last lap of the race one of the runners began to pull ahead. We waved as the train pulled out of the station. Our armies are pulling back on all fronts. pull yourself along, up, etc. B2 [T] to take hold of something and use effort to move your body forwards or up: She pulled herself up the stairs, holding onto the rail. He put his hands on the side of the pool and pulled himself out of the water.

pull verb (ATTRACT)

[T] to attract a person or people: The show has certainly pulled (in) the crowds. [I or T] UK informal to succeed in starting a sexual relationship with someone: He certainly knows how to pull women. Did Tracy pull at the nightclub last night?

pull verb (INJURE)

C2 [T] to injure a muscle by stretching it too much: I pulled a muscle in my back lifting some drawers. He pulled a hamstring.

pull verb (DISHONEST)

[T] slang to perform a dishonest action: The gang that pulled the bank robbery were all arrested. No one's gonna pull that kind of trick on me!

pull verb (INTERNET)

[T] specialized internet & telecoms to get information from the internet, after asking or searching for it: Companies should encourage customers to pull information from their website, thus putting the customer in control.
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pull

noun uk   /pʊl/ us  

pull noun (MOVEMENT TOWARDS YOU)

[C usually singular] the act of pulling something towards yourself: Give the rope a hard pull. [C] something that you pull to make something work or to open something: a curtain pull a drawer pull

pull noun (ATTRACTION)

[C] something that attracts people: "How can we persuade people to come to the meeting?" "A glass of wine is quite a good pull." [U] the physical or emotional power to attract something: The greater the mass of an object, the greater its gravitational pull. The movie's all-star cast should give it a lot of pull.

pull noun (INFLUENCE)

[U] influence: He's still got quite a bit of pull in the club - he could probably get you elected.
(Definition of pull from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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