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English definition of “pulse”

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pulse

noun uk   /pʌls/ us  

pulse noun (REGULAR BEAT)

C1 [C] the regular beating of the heart, especially when it is felt at the wrist or side of the neck: The child's pulse was strong/weak. Exercise increases your pulse rate.take sb's pulse to hold someone's wrist and count how many times the heart beats in one minute [C] a short period of energy that is repeated regularly, such as a short, loud sound or a short flash of light: The data, normally transmitted electronically, can be changed into pulses of light.

pulse noun (FOOD)

pulses [plural] specialized seeds such as beans or peas that are cooked and eaten: Pulses include peas, lentils, and chickpeas.

pulse

verb [I] uk   /pʌls/ us  
to move or beat with a strong, regular rhythm: I could feel the blood pulsing through my veins.
Translations of “pulse”
in Korean 맥박…
in Arabic نَبْض…
in French pouls…
in Turkish nabız, nabız atışı…
in Italian polso, battito…
in Chinese (Traditional) 規律跳動, 脈搏, (聲波或光波的)脈衝…
in Russian пульс…
in Polish puls, tętno…
in Spanish pulso…
in Portuguese pulso…
in German der Puls…
in Catalan pols…
in Japanese 脈拍, 鼓動…
in Chinese (Simplified) 规律跳动, 脉搏, (声波或光波的)脉冲…
(Definition of pulse from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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