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English definition of “pure”

pure

adjective uk   /pjʊər/ us    /pjʊr/

pure adjective (NOT MIXED)

B1 not mixed with anything else: a pure cotton shirt pure orange juice pure English honey a pure Arab horse describes a colour that is not mixed with any other colour: a swan's pure white plumage describes a sound that is clear and perfect: the pure vocal tones of the choirboy B1 clean and free from harmful substances: The mountain air was wonderfully pure. Tap water is never chemically pure.
Opposite

pure adjective (COMPLETE)

B2 [before noun] complete; only: It was pure coincidence/chance that we met. This last month has been pure hell. Her face had a look of pure delight. The minister dismissed the newspaper reports as pure speculation. [before noun] describes an area of study that is studied only for the purpose of developing theories about it, not for the purpose of using those theories in a practical way: pure mathematics pure economics pure and simple used after a noun to mean 'and nothing else': He is motivated by greed, pure and simple.

pure adjective (MORALLY GOOD)

behaving in a way that is morally completely good, or not having sex: I'm trying to think only pure thoughts. He invited me up to his flat for coffee, but I didn't think that his motives were entirely pure. In many cultures, it is considered important for a woman to keep herself pure (= not to have sex) until she marries.
Opposite
(Definition of pure from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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