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English definition of “rather”

rather

adverb uk   /ˈrɑː.ðər/ us    /ˈræð.ɚ/

rather adverb (SMALL AMOUNT)

B1 quite; to a slight degree: It's rather cold today, isn't it? That's rather a difficult book - here's an easier one for you. The train was rather too crowded for a comfortable journey. She answered the phone rather sleepily. I rather doubt I'll be able to come to your party.

rather adverb (MORE EXACTLY)

B2 more accurately; more exactly: She'll go to London on Thursday, or rather, she will if she has to. He's my sister's friend really, rather than mine. used to express an opposite opinion: The ending of the war is not a cause for celebration, but rather for regret that it ever happened. No, I'm not tired. Rather the opposite in fact.

rather adverb (PREFERENCE)

rather than B1 instead of; used especially when you prefer one thing to another: I think I'd like to stay at home this evening rather than go out.

rather

rather

(Definition of rather from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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