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English definition of “recall”

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recall

verb uk   /rɪˈkɔːl/ us    /ˈriː.kɑːl/

recall verb (REMEMBER)

B2 [I or T] to bring the memory of a past event into your mind, and often to give a description of what you remember: The old man recalled the city as it had been before the war. "As I recall," he said with some irritation, "you still owe me €150." [+ (that)] He recalled (that) he had sent the letter over a month ago. [+ question word] Can you recall what happened last night? [+ -ing verb] She recalled seeing him outside the shop on the night of the robbery. [T] to cause you to think of a particular event, situation, or style: His paintings recall the style of Picasso.
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recall verb (CALL BACK)

[T] to order the return of a person who belongs to an organization or of products made by a company: The ambassador was recalled when war broke out. The company recalled thousands of tins of baby food after a salmonella scare.

recall

noun uk   /rɪˈkɔːl/ us    /ˈriː.kɑːl/

recall noun (REMEMBERING)

[U] the ability to remember things: Old people often have astonishing powers of recall. My brother has total recall (= he can remember every detail of past events).

recall noun (CALLING BACK)

[C usually singular] an occasion when someone orders the return of a person who belongs to an organization, or orders the return of products made by a company: an emergency recall of Parliament The company issued a recall of all their latest antibiotics.
(Definition of recall from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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