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English definition of “redeem”

redeem

verb uk   /rɪˈdiːm/ us  

redeem verb (IMPROVE)

[T] formal to make something or someone seem less bad: A poor game was redeemed in the second half by a couple of superb goals from Anthony Edwards. He was an hour late, but he redeemed himself in her eyes by giving her a huge bunch of flowers. She took me to see a really dull film, the only redeeming feature of which (= the only thing which prevented it from being completely bad) was the soundtrack.

redeem verb (GET BACK)

[T] to get something back: She managed to save enough money to redeem her jewellery from the pawn shop.

redeem verb (EXCHANGE)

redeem a coupon, voucher, etc. to exchange a piece of paper representing a particular amount of money for that amount of money or for goods to this value

redeem verb (SATISFY)

[T] formal to carry out a promise or pay back a debt: The amount required to redeem the mortgage was £358,587.

redeem verb (RELIGION)

[T] (in Christianity) to free people from sin: "Jesus," said the priest, "saved and redeemed mankind by taking our sins upon himself."
(Definition of redeem from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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