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English definition of “remember”

remember

verb uk   /rɪˈmem.bər/ us    /-bɚ/
A1 [I or T] to be able to bring back a piece of information into your mind, or to keep a piece of information in your memory: "Where did you park the car?" "I can't remember." I can remember people's faces, but not their names. [+ (that)] She suddenly remembered (that) her keys were in her other bag. [+ -ing verb] I don't remember signing a contract. [+ question word] Can you remember what her phone number is? I remember him as (= I thought he was) a rather annoying man. remember to do sth A2 to not forget to do something: Did you remember to do the shopping? be remembered for sth to be kept in people's memories because of a particular action or quality: She will be remembered for her courage. you remember informal said when you are talking to someone about something that they used to know but might have forgotten: We went and had tea in that little café - you remember, the one next to the bookshop. [T] to hold a special ceremony to honour a past event or someone who has died: On 11 November, the British remember those who died in the two World Wars. [T] to give a present or money to someone you love or who has provided good service to you: My Granny always remembers me (= sends me a present) on my birthday. My cousin remembered me in her will.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of remember from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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