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English definition of “respective”

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respective

adjective [before noun] uk   /rɪˈspek.tɪv/ us  
C1 relating or belonging to each of the separate people or things you have just mentioned: Everyone would go into the hall for assembly and then afterwards we'd go to our respective classes. Clinton and Zedillo ordered their respective Cabinets to devise a common counter-drug strategy.
respectively
adverb uk   /-li/ us  
More examples
  • The two meals cost us £50 and £80 respectively.
  • He earned an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Chicago University in 1968 and 1972 respectively.
  • Steven and James are aged 10 and 13 respectively.
  • Her two daughters, Jo and Fiona, were born in 1968 and 1975 respectively.
  • The storage tanks can hold 50, 100 and 200 litres of fuel respectively.
In the 200 metres, Lizzy and Sarah came first and third respectively (= Lizzy won the race and Sarah was third).
Translations of “respective”
in Chinese (Traditional) 各自的, 各個的, 分別的…
in Russian соответственный…
in Turkish kendi, herkes kendi, ayrı ayrı…
in Chinese (Simplified) 各自的, 各个的, 分别的…
in Polish odpowiedni, poszczególny…
(Definition of respective from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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