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English definition of “reverse”

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reverse

verb uk   /rɪˈvɜːs/ us    /-ˈvɝːs/

reverse verb (CHANGE TO OPPOSITE)

C1 [T] to change the direction, order, position, result, etc. of something to its opposite: The new manager hoped to reverse the decline in the company's fortunes. Now that you have a job and I don't, our situations are reversed. The Court of Appeal reversed the earlier judgment.
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reverse verb (DRIVE BACKWARDS)

B2 [I or T] to drive a vehicle backwards: He reversed into a lamppost and damaged the back of the car. She reversed the car into the parking space.

reverse verb (PHONE)

reverse the charges ( US also call collect) to make a phone call that is paid for by the person receiving it

reverse

noun uk   /rɪˈvɜːs/ us    /-ˈvɝːs/
the reverse
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C2 the opposite of what has been suggested: The teachers say my son is slow, but I believe the reverse (is true). the back of a coin, medal, etc.: The English £1 coin has a royal coat of arms on the reverse.
in reverse (order) C1 in the opposite order or way: To stop the engine, you repeat the same procedures, but in reverse (order).C2 [U] ( also reverse gear) the method of controlling a vehicle that makes it go backwards: To go backwards, you must put the car in/into reverse (gear). [C] formal a defeat or failure: They suffered a serious military/political reverse.
reverse
adjective [before noun]
Repeat the steps in reverse order to shut the system off. the reverse side of the cloth
(Definition of reverse from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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