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English definition of “ride”

ride

verb uk   /raɪd/ (rode, ridden) us  
A1 [I or T] to sit on a horse or a bicycle and travel along on it controlling its movements: I learned to ride a bike when I was six. I ride my bicycle to work. I ride to work on my bicycle. The hunters came riding by/past on their horses. He rides well/badly (= he can ride horses well/badly). A2 [I or T] to travel in a vehicle, such as a car, bus, or train: mainly US We rode the train from San Diego to Portland. He doesn't have a car so he rides to work on the bus. [T] US to try to control someone and force them to work: Your boss is riding you much too hard at the moment.

ride

noun [C] uk   /raɪd/ us  
B1 a journey on a horse or bicycle, or in a vehicle: It's a short bus ride to the airport. I went for a (horse) ride last Saturday. Do you want to come for a ride on my bike? B1 mainly US (UK usually lift) a free journey in a car to a place where you want to go: He asked me for a ride into town. US a person who gives you a ride in their car: Well, I have to go - my ride is here. US informal someone's car: Hey, nice ride. B1 a machine in an amusement park that people travel in or are moved around by for entertainment: My favourite ride is the Ferris wheel.
(Definition of ride from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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