ring definition, meaning - what is ring in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “ring”

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ring

noun uk   us   /rɪŋ/

ring noun (CIRCLE)

B2 [C] a circle of any material, or any group of things or people in a circular shape or arrangement: The game involved throwing metal rings over a stick. The children sat in a ring around the teacher.A2 [C] a circular piece of jewellery worn especially on your finger: He bought her a diamond/emerald, etc. ring (= a ring with a jewel attached to it). [C] a group of people who help each other, often secretly and in a way that is to their advantage: a drug ring a spy ring
See also
[C] (US usually element) a circular piece of material often made of metal that can be heated in order to be used for cooking: a gas ring an electric ring [C] a special area where people perform or compete: a boxing ring The horses trotted round the ring.
See also
rings [plural] two round handles at the ends of two long ropes that hang from the ceiling and are used in gymnastics
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ring noun (PHONE)

A2 [S] mainly UK (US usually and UK also call) the act of making a phone call to someone: I'll give you a ring tomorrow.

ring noun (SOUND)

B2 [C] the sound a bell makes: There was a ring at the door. He gave a ring at the door.

ring

verb uk   us   /rɪŋ/

ring verb (PHONE)

A2 [I or T] (rang, rung) mainly UK (US usually and UK also call) to make a phone call to someone: I ring home once a week to tell my parents I'm okay. There's been an accident - can you ring for an ambulance? The boss rang (in) to say he'll be back at 4.30.UK I rang round the airlines (= called many of them) to find out the cheapest price. Why don't you ring (up) Simon and ask him to the party?
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ring verb (MAKE SOUND)

B1 [I or T] (rang, rung) to (cause to) make the sound of a bell: The doorbell/phone rang. Anne's alarm clock rang for half an hour before she woke. I rang the bell but nobody came to the door. My head is/My ears are still ringing (= are full of a ringing noise) from the sound of the military band.
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ring verb (CIRCLE)

[T] (ringed, ringed) to surround something: Armed police ringed the hijacked plane. The harbour is dangerous - it's ringed by/with rocks and reefs. UK [T] (ringed, ringed) to draw a circle round something: Students should ring the correct answers in pencil. [T] (ringed, ringed) to put a ring on something, especially an animal: We ringed the birds (= put rings around their legs) so that we could identify them later.
(Definition of ring from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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