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English definition of “rocket”

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rocket

noun uk   /ˈrɒk.ɪt/ us    /ˈrɑː.kɪt/

rocket noun (DEVICE)

B2 [C] a large cylinder-shaped object that moves very fast by forcing out burning gases, used for space travel or as a weapon: They launched a rocket to the planet Venus. The rebels were firing anti-tank rockets. [C] ( also skyrocket) a type of firework that flies up into the air before exploding
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rocket noun (PLANT)

[U] UK ( US arugula) a plant whose long green leaves are used in salads

rocket

verb [I often + adv/prep] uk   /ˈrɒk.ɪt/ us    /ˈrɑː.kɪt/ ( also skyrocket) informal
to rise extremely quickly or make extremely quick progress towards success: House prices in the north are rocketing (up). Their team rocketed to the top of the League. Sharon Stone rocketed to fame in the film "Basic Instinct".
Translations of “rocket”
in Korean 로켓…
in Arabic صاروخ…
in French fusée, roquette…
in Turkish roket, füze, bomba…
in Italian razzo, missile…
in Chinese (Traditional) 裝置, 火箭, 火箭引擎…
in Russian ракета, реактивный снаряд…
in Polish rakieta…
in Spanish cohete…
in Portuguese foguete…
in German die Rakete…
in Catalan coet…
in Japanese ロケット…
in Chinese (Simplified) 装置, 火箭, 火箭发动机…
(Definition of rocket from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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