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English definition of “rush”

rush

verb uk   /rʌʃ/ us  

rush verb (GO/DO QUICKLY)

B2 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to (cause to) go or do something very quickly: Whenever I see him, he seems to be rushing (about/around). I rushed up the stairs/to the office/to find a phone. When she turned it upside down the water rushed out. [+ to infinitive] We shouldn't rush to blame them. You can't rush a job like this. The emergency legislation was rushed through Parliament in a morning. Don't rush me! The United Nations has rushed medical aid and food to the famine zone. He rushed the children off to school so they wouldn't be late.

rush verb (ATTACK)

[T] If a group of people rush an enemy or the place where an enemy is, they attack suddenly and all together: We rushed the palace gates and killed the guards.

rush verb (AMERICAN FOOTBALL)

[I] In American football, to rush is to carry the ball forward across the place on the field where play begins. Also, a member of the opposite team rushes when they force their way to the back of the field quickly to catch the player carrying the ball.

rush

noun uk   /rʌʃ/ us  

rush noun (HURRY)

B2 [S] a situation in which you have to hurry or move somewhere quickly: Slow down! What's the rush? Why is it always such a rush to get ready in the mornings? Everyone seemed to be in a rush. He was in a rush to get home. They were in no rush to sell the house. C2 [S] a time when a lot of things are happening or a lot of people are trying to do or get something: There's always a rush to get the best seats. I try to do my shopping before the Christmas rush. There's been a rush for (= sudden popular demand for) tickets. C2 [S] the act of suddenly moving somewhere quickly: There was a rush of air as she opened the door. They made a rush at him to get his gun. [S] a sudden movement of people to a certain area, usually because of some economic advantage: the California gold rush [C] in American football, an attempt to run forwards carrying the ball, or an attempt to quickly reach and stop a player from the opposing team who is carrying the ball

rush noun (SUDDEN FEELING)

[S] a sudden strong emotion or physical feeling: The memory of who he was came back to him with a rush. I had my first cigarette for a year and felt a sudden rush (of dizziness).

rush noun (PLANT)

[C usually plural] a plant like grass that grows in or near water and whose long, thin, hollow stems can be dried and made into floor coverings, containers, etc.: a rush mat
(Definition of rush from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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