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English definition of “sail”

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sail

verb uk   /seɪl/ us  

sail verb (TRAVEL)

B2 [I usually + adv/prep] When a boat or a ship sails, it travels on the water: The boat sailed along/down the coast. As the battleship sailed by/past, everyone on deck waved. The ship was sailing to China.B1 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to control a boat that has no engine and is pushed by the wind: He sailed the dinghy up the river. She sailed around the world single-handed in her yacht. [I] When a ship sails, it starts its journey, and when people sail from a particular place or at a particular time, they start their journey in a ship: Their ship sails for Bombay next Friday.
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sail verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[I + adv/prep] to move quickly, easily, and (of a person) confidently: The ball went sailing over the garden fence. He wasn't looking where he was going, and just sailed straight into her. Manchester United sailed on (= continued easily) to victory in the final.

sail

noun uk   /seɪl/ us  

sail noun (MATERIAL)

C2 [C] a sheet of material attached to a pole on a boat to catch the wind and make the boat move: to hoist/lower the sails [C] On a windmill , a sail is any of the wide blades that are turned by the wind in order to produce power.

sail noun (TRAVEL)

[S] a journey by boat or ship: It's two days' sail/It's a two-day sail (= a journey of two days by sea) from here to the nearest island.set sail C2 to begin a boat journey: We set sail from Kuwait. They set sail for France.
Idioms
(Definition of sail from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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