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English definition of “sale”

sale

noun uk   /seɪl/ us  

sale noun (SELL)

B2 [C or U] an act of exchanging something for money: The sale of cigarettes/alcohol is forbidden. The building company get commission on each house sale. I haven't made a sale all morning. They'll drop the price rather than lose the sale. for sale A2 available to buy: Is this painting for sale? Our neighbours put their house up for sale (= started to advertise that they want to sell it) last week. sales [U, + sing/pl verb] the department of a company that organizes and does the selling of the company's products or services: He works in Sales. the sales department/manager sales [plural] B2 the number of products sold: Sales this year exceeded the total for the two previous years.
See also
[C] an occasion when things are sold, especially by an organization such as a school or church, in order to make money for the organization: a charity/Christmas/book sale [C] an auction (= public sale): a sale of antique furniture a cattle sale on sale B1 UK available to buy in a shop: On sale at record stores now. sale or return a system by which goods are supplied to shops and can be returned if they are not sold within a particular period of time: We can supply goods on a sale or return basis.

sale noun (CHEAP PRICE)

A2 [C] an occasion when goods are sold at a lower price than usual: a mid-season/end-of-season sale a clearance/closing-down sale I bought this in the January sales. sale goods/prices on sale A2 mainly US (UK usually in the sale) reduced in price: Can you tell me if this dress is in the sale?
(Definition of sale from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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