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English definition of “salute”

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salute

verb uk   /səˈluːt/ us  

salute verb (SHOW RESPECT)

[I or T] (especially of people in the armed forces) to make a formal sign of respect to someone, especially by raising the right hand to the side of the head: Whenever you see an officer, you must salute. The soldiers saluted the colonel.

salute verb (PRAISE)

[T] formal to honour or express admiration publicly for a person or an achievement: On this memorable occasion we salute the wonderful work done by the association. We salute you for your courage and determination.

salute

noun [C] uk   /səˈluːt/ us  

salute noun [C] (SHOW OF RESPECT)

a sign of respect made to someone by raising the right hand to the side of the head: The soldier gave a salute and the officer returned it. an action, such as firing a gun, done to show respect to someone: Full military honours and a 21-gun salute (= 21 guns fired at the same time) marked his funeral.

salute noun [C] (PRAISE)

an action or sign to honour or show your admiration for a person or achievement
Translations of “salute”
in Korean 거수 경례…
in Arabic تَحِيّة عَسْكَرِيّة…
in French saluer…
in Turkish asker selâmı…
in Italian saluto (militare)…
in Chinese (Traditional) 表示尊敬, (尤指軍人)敬禮…
in Russian воинское приветствие…
in Polish salut, honory…
in Spanish saludar…
in Portuguese continência…
in German salutieren, grüßen…
in Catalan salutació…
in Japanese 敬礼…
in Chinese (Simplified) 表示尊敬, (尤指军人)敬礼…
(Definition of salute from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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