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English definition of “same”

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same

adjective uk   /seɪm/ us  

same adjective (EXACTLY LIKE)

the same
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A1 exactly like another or each other: My twin sister and I have the same nose. She was wearing exactly the same dress as I was. Hilary's the same age as me. She brought up her children in just (= exactly) the same way her mother did.
Compare

same adjective (NOT ANOTHER)

A1 [before noun] not another different place, time, situation, person, or thing: My brother and I sleep in the same room. Rachel's still going out with the same boyfriend. That (very) same day, he heard he'd passed his exam. I would do the same thing again if I had the chance. They eat at the same restaurant every week. Shall we meet up at the same time tomorrow?
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same

pronoun uk   /seɪm/ us  

same pronoun (EXACTLY LIKE)

the same as A2 exactly like: People say I look just the same as my sister. John thinks the same as I do - it's just too expensive.the same B2 not changed: After all these years you look exactly the same - you haven't changed a bit. Charles is just the same as always.

same pronoun (NOT ANOTHER)

the same B1 not another different thing or situation: I'm hopeless at physics, and it's the same with chemistry - I get it all wrong. [before noun] humorous not another different person: "Was that Marion on the phone?" "The (very) same."

same

Translations of “same”
in Spanish parecido, mismo, igual…
in French semblable, même…
in German gleich…
in Chinese (Simplified) 非常相似…
in Chinese (Traditional) 非常相似…
(Definition of same from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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